Ice Fishing Technology

Ice Fishing Technology: The Evolution of Ice Fishing Electronics

The world of open water fishing technology is constantly changing, yet ice fishing technology has remained relatively unchanged until recent years. ANGLR has created a device that is going to change the game for ice fishing electronics.

Ice Fishing Technology: Old School Tactics

When I was first introduced to ice fishing almost 30 years ago, we used a small 1 to 2-ounce lead weight attached to an alligator grip that we called a “depth checker” to check water depth… how about that for a technical name?  

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My uncle, Paul Glasgow, would often make his own clips out of spent 30-06 shell casings filled with lead and an alligator clip melted into the lead. We would attach the clip to a lure or hook and then drop the weight into the lake to determine the depth by measuring the length of line between the weight and the ice. I can’t tell you how many holes I drilled in the ice, going from hole to hole looking for some sort of change in depth – a rock pile, creek channel, or any random depth change – because as we all know, that’s where the fish are.  

Once we found fish, or a sudden change, we would mark our spot with stick, by piling up snow.

Meet The Simplest Way To Track Your Ice Fishing Trips

The only other option was to mark the spot by identifying a shoreline feature we could use to find our location again. For several years, this little “bullet depth checker” was the most advanced piece of technology on the ice, not just for me, but for others, as well.

Ice Fishing Technology: The Evolution to Flashers

As I got a little older and more serious about ice fishing, I was introduced to “flashers”.  One of the most popular flashers ever invented was the Vexilar FL-8. The FL-8 was first introduced in the late 1980’s and completely revolutionized the world of ice fishing.

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Image Credit: Vexilar.com

For the first time, ice anglers could check the depth of the water and see fish in real time.

Shortly after, others followed suit producing variations of both flashers and fish finders. The flasher has remained relatively unchanged for the last twenty years and is still one of the most commonly used electronic devices on the ice.

Ice Fishing Technology: Marking Spots

Before GPS technology, serious ice anglers who were interested in marking their fishing spots would identify markers on shore such as a tree or a telephone pole. If you were lucky, you carried a secondary GPS, often times a handheld device, or if you were crazy enough, figured out how to rig a lawnmower or snowmobile battery to your boat’s fish finder and hauled that out onto the ice.

For a short period of time, I used a handheld GPS along with a Vexilar Fl-8, until I dropped my GPS down a hole.

Within the last few years, only a few fishing electronic companies have added GPS and mapping technology to ice fish finders, but these “extras” cost anywhere from $400 to well over $1,000+ for those features. This cost doesn’t even include the cost of (multiple) map cards.

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Also, the technology is often big and bulky due to the size of battery and isn’t ideal when you’re carrying all of your ice fishing supplies. The entry of ANGLR into the ice fishing market has changed the way we look at GPS and fish mapping technology in a huge way.

Ice Fishing Technology: Changing the Game

ANGLR has invented a device called the Bullseye which is about the size of a quarter and can easily attach to your baseball cap or onto a lanyard worn around your neck. At only $29, the device has a built in battery with a two year life span that doesn’t require charging. The Bullseye pairs to your smartphone via Bluetooth technology and free ANGLR app, and is available for both iPhone and Android, free.

Ice Fishing Technology

To set it up, simply launch the app from your phone and hit record, then pair the Bullseye in the app and begin tracking your every move. You can then access your tracking records from an in-app map, but the Bullseye doesn’t stop there. With one simple push of the button on top of the Bullseye, you can mark a fish catch which is instantly logged to the app. Press the button two times and your GPS location is recorded to the map as an editable waypoint. At the end of the day, you review your logs and save your trip for future reference – and this is just part of what ANGLR Bullesye can do.

If you don’t want to carry a second GPS along with your fish finder, or don’t want to spend 100’s of dollars on overpriced fishing technology, ANGLR is for you. ANGLR has taken the bulkiness, the cost, and complication out of fish mapping technology. In fact, we believe in this product so much that you’ll find every single one of our WPA Hardwater staff at our 2019 tournaments using it. We’ll also be teaching our ice anglers how to utilize their ANGLR Bullseye.

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This article was contributed by an ANGLR Expert

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Gus Glasgow

ABOUT Gus

As a passionate sportsman and fisherman , I have been enjoying the the great outdoors of Western Pennsylvania since a child. I quickly fell in love with fishing competing in my first tournaments at the age of 6. 30 years later my passion is just as strong. I have competed at multiple levels of bass tournament competition and was fortunate enough to travel and fish in tournaments all across the country. In addition to fishing bass tournaments, in 2016 I created WPA Hardwater, an ice fishing tournament series based out of western, PA. As a Tournament Director I not only enjoy competing but helping others get introduced to ice fishing. In 2019 I look forward to launching an ice fishing guide service based in Western, PA. I will be focusing on helping others enjoy the sport of ice fish and spreading the knowledge I have gained over the years to help others become successful.

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ANGLR Expert, Gus Glasgow

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